BreezyPals™

Bridge between worlds

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Never Give Up – Always try; failing at one game does not mean you will fail at another. Skills in children

Six-year-old Missy returned home one day sad and crying. I gave her a hug, wiped away her tears and tried to calm her down. Missy continued to cry uncontrollably, and when I asked her why she was crying she refused to tell me. She would not under any circumstance share with me why she was so upset. I felt complete helplessness and frustration at my inability to protect her. In the meantime, Missy had fallen asleep on the couch. I watched her and asked myself, “If only I knew who had made my Missy cry so.” Horrible thoughts invaded my mind as I imagined Missy in difficult situations. With anger I said to myself, “I am willing to pay a whole lot to find out who made Missy cry like this.”

An hour later when Missy awoke, I made us both a fruit shake and sat Missy with me down at the kitchen table to “chat”. I chatted much more than her. I told her about my childhood, about a playground friend who would hit me, pull my hair and call me bad names. Missy listened but did not react. I again felt helpless; I so wanted her to share her pain with me, but did not know how to motivate her to do so.

I suggested to Missy that her and I bake a cake together (although I am generally not very good at baking). Missy decided that she wanted to make a chocolate cream cake. We searched for a recipe, and used the recipe we found to make the cake. Missy was so happy, laughing and giggling and entirely forgetting that an hour before she had been sad and crying. I was still disturbed by the idea that someone had hurt my little girl. We finished with the cake preparations, licked the spoon, and preheated the oven for baking. After 50 minutes, just like it says in the recipe, we took the steaming cake out of the oven. Unfortunately, while the cake did not topple or collapse, it looked about as appetizing as a pile of hard cement. I sat down heavily in a chair and said to my young daughter, “Missy, I am so sorry, I am not a very good baker, I can’t even bake a cake according to the recipe and I don’t know why. My cakes always turn out too hard or too soft, and even though I try very hard, I still can’t get it right. I know you’re disappointed.”

Missy looked at me with an amused expression and said, “Mum, don’t be sad. You are good at other things, like making me food that I like, like healthy sandwiches and omelets. So what if you’re not good at making cake?” I smiled and asked my young daughter, “Missy, has it ever happened to you that you tried and failed at something?” Missy answered, “That is exactly why I cried today when I came home from school.” I was immediately alert, asking, “What happened? Did you bake a cake that wasn’t very good?”

Missy giggled and told me that she was supposed to cut three circles out of a picture, and couldn’t cut the circles accurately, each time slipping up and cutting the circle in the half. “Do you know how to draw circles?” I asked Missy. “Sure”, she answered. “So, instead of giving up, why don’t you draw circles rather than cut them out? If you don’t succeed in one thing, that doesn’t mean you won’t succeed in something else! “Never give up.”

Missy giggled again and said, “Look who’s talking! Mum, if you can’t bake a cake, cook a cake!” I smiled, mumbling to myself that it’s probably safer for me to simply buy a cake.

The lesson? Never give up. Always try; failing at one game does not mean you will fail at another.See BreezyPals™' way

For more ideas watch the video: BreezyPals™-How to teach your kid to never give up?  

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BreezyPals™-Monsters and Ghosts are Scared of the Flashlight

It was the dark hours of the night. The house was silent, and the children were sleeping peacefully in their beds. They looked so sweet as they sleep. I covered them with blankets and whispered wishes of sweet dreams in their ears. Like every night, I hoped that this night my children would sleep uninterruptedly and without cries of “Mum, there is a monster in my room.”

A few hours later, I heard a heart-wrenching cry from the children’s room. I ran to check what the matter was, which of my children was crying so, and how to quiet him down before he woke the rest of my children from their dreams. It had become a permanent situation in my household: the children cry at night, and Mum is exhausted in the morning.

Each night I would pray for them to sleep soundly, and each night the same ritual would repeat itself. Rather than get angry, I try to console myself by saying, “What fun, I get another opportunity to see my children again at night.”

After much effort, I finally managed to calm down my scared child and convince him that there were no monsters in the room that night.

I sat in the kitchen, bleary eyed and exhausted, poured myself a cup of tea and decided: ‘I need to find a solution to this problem’.

How? What more could I do? I had told all the monster stories I knew, had tried to convince my children that monsters were not realwhat else could I do? I know that fear is a natural emotion both in children and adults, but why were my children so dead set on fearing monsters? Couldn’t they be afraid of dogs, ants or birds? In that case, we could have quelled the fear of raising a dog at home and teaching the children to love him. But monsters? How do I teach the children to love something that doesn’t exist? I sat thinking for a while, until finally I had a thought: I needed to change direction entirely. I decided that I needed to treat monsters not as imaginary creatures, but as real creatures with fears and emotions just like us. These monsters were scared of the light, so all the children needed to do to banish them was to turn on a flashlight.

The next night, I put the younger children to bed and we talked about fear. I told them about my fears, and then each told me what they were most afraid of. In the end, I added, “Did you know that monsters also have fears?” They looked at me in wonder and asked, “Really? What monsters are afraid of?” “From light, of course”, I answered. “If you turn on a flashlight in the dark, the monsters will see the light and run away.” When I lay the children to sleep that night, I gave each a flashlight and said, “If a monster comes, turn this on and it’ll go away.”

In doing so, I had given my children a tangible tool to deal with their fear.

At night, when my youngest son woke up and asked me to banish the scary witch in his room, I told him to use his flashlight. He illuminated the room, looked around and saw that there was no witch.
After a few nights, the crying at night had stopped. Lo and behold, and the children slept soundly and peacefully, and so did I.

After another quiet night my husband joked, “We have replaced witches with batteries.”

To illustrate how to manage your children’s fear of monsters, watch the following video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9zHkm58SKc

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BreezyPals™- How to turn points of contention between you and your child into enjoyable, fun activities?

Mealtime Activities

It is every mother’s dream for her children to help around the house. Dividing chores and duties amongst our children helps them develop into responsible, contributing family members.
Every day I would ask my children to help me set the table, to eat politely, to help clear the table and to wash the dishes. Every day my request would be met with negative responses or go entirely ignored. Every day was the same predictable arguments and disappointments, unsolved by my countless speeches and requests. I simply could not get them to help.
I searched for a way to reach my children, to turn this point of contention into a fun, enjoyable activity for us all. I searched for a way to get them to cooperate without the daily struggle.

I believe that the mealtime can be fun through games, stories and entertainment. One day, I went to “Ekea” and bought a green box. I wrapped it with a plaid cloth, added various dishes and silverware, and designed various placemats, cards and games to put inside.

One morning, I gave the box as a present to my child. I told him that the box was his and only his, and that he was responsible for its contents and its organization. Each day he could choose a placemat, dish, card and game he wanted to use. From that moment, the creativity blossomed in the household. My son would set the table on his box, clear the dishes after the meal, wash, and place the dishes back inside the box.

What was in the box that helped him to cooperate?

The plaid cloth wrapped around the table could also be used as a   game board to use for developmental math and reasoning games.
The placemats could also be used as a game board, such as developmental language and reasoning games.
A variety of cards with funny messages regarding chores, such as “Feed me, I’m too tired”, or “Make food items disappear in my mouth!”
Various Tupperware, dishes and silverware with interesting stickers.

My child loved his personal food box, and it helped turn food and mealtimes into an enjoyable game where he could happily take part in household chores. I had finally reached my goal. I did not have to ask, argue, get angry or yell for help – my son offered help both before and after the meal.

I had succeeded in turning this point of contention into an enjoyable activity that helped open new channels of communication between my son and me as part of skills in children in early childhood development.

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What do BreezyPals™ do on Thanksgiving day?

What do BreezyPals™ do on Thanksgiving day?

Hello, my name is BreezyBud
And on my tail, you see
I have a little Breezypal friend
Who rides along with me.

We’re from a club called BreezyPals
Who live up in the sky.
We ride on magic breezes
So far away – so high!

The two of us are tiny
And young, with lots to learn;
For our friends we yearn,
Down with the wind we turn.”

.
“On Thanksgiving day, we played together
A sky-high game of ball
We had such fun we didn’t see
The snow about to fall.

We got caught up in the snowflakes
And drifted in the sky
To Breezyclub’s open window
Upon the floor to lie.

We saw the preparation
For a Thanksgiving feast,
It’s time for celebration.
In the BreezyPals nation.

“Well every Thanksgiving day,
Many many new BreezyPals appear
We welcome these new friends,
Each Thanksgiving of every year.”

“We collect the new young BreezyPals
And bring them home
We call them Thanksgiving Pals
Then they start to roam”


Choosing Time begins:
The time to pick their partners out –
Each BreezyPal has a twin.
They will find him without doubt”

“One friend is always bigger,
The other always small:
Just small enough to ride upon
The BreezyPal who’s tall.

“Up high above the clouds then,
The wind begins to blow.
It rocks the BreezyPals, swinging them
So gently, to and fro.

“As the wind gets stronger,
BreezyPals are gently blown;
Down to a cloud below them
They are lightly thrown.

“And in the cloud’s soft center
Everything is white!
They lick a snowy popsicle
And take an icy bite.

“Like cotton candy all around
The clouds are light and bright.
They gaze in wonder all about
At such a lovely sight.

“The BreezyPals are so happy there
While flying through the air
They know they’ll never separate —
They’ll always be a pair.”

“So BreezyBuzz, you were born on Thanksgiving day
Did you choose me right away?”
I realy want to know.
Was it so long ago?”

“I met you five years ago,”
Said Breezysbuzz,
“On Thanksgiving day by the floe
It all began in a cloud call yo.

“I sat upon a cloud then,
I looked both left and right,
And everything I saw around
Was beautiful and white.

“Then suddenly I saw you from
The corner of my eye.
I knew we’d be together then
Forever, you and I.

“We were so very happy
We hugged each other tight.
I climbed right up onto your back,
Held on with all my might.

“We’d just been playing happily
High up there in the sky;
We jumped around and flew about,
My Thanksgivingpal and I

“And then upon the magic wind
We went to take a ride.
It huffed and puffed and said to us,
‘We’re going for a slide!’

“We slid so fast, so smoothly
Along the sun’s bright beams!
We sailed across the bright blue sky
Just like in our dreams.

And will never ever forget,
That Thanksgiving day,
When we both have met.
I was so happy,
So where you I bet!

Happy Thanksgiving with BreezyPal™

Filed under BreezyPals skills in children early childhood development

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The Imaginary Friend

When I was five years old I had an imaginary friend. I do not remember if he had a name, but I do remember that I loved him very much. I would hide him in my pocket so that he could accompany me everywhere – to kindergarten, to the playground, to family visits. I would save a place for him next to me in the car and in bed, and let him eat off my plate at mealtimes. He was with me throughout the most significant moments in my life, like when we moved to a new apartment and when I started First Grade. He was my companion when I was happy or sad, when I laughed or cried. He was my advisor and my mentor. I would tell him stories and ask his advice. I was sorry he was invisible and intangible.

My imaginary friend was my own private secret. I did not want to share him with anyone or tell my family about him. I remember one time when my mother overheard me speaking to him and asked, “Who are you speaking to?” I did not know what to say. If I had told her about my imaginary friend, I am certain she would have said, “There is no such thing”. But for me there was such thing; I really did have a friend who happened to be imaginary. So I remained quiet, and kept my friend a secret.

Research shows that having an imaginary friend is common in a child’s developmental stage, especially with creative children. Statistically, 65% of children experience imaginary friends at one point in their development. Often this experience continues until after the child has begun school.

So who is this imaginary friend? An imaginary friend is a personal companion who belongs only to one child. He is someone with whom the child can share emotions, find consolation, relay messages to and relieve boredom with. He is also someone on whom the child can place blame, for example, “I didn’t take the last piece of cake, my friend did.”

Young children tend to connect to objects from the past. According to psychoanalysis Donald Woods Winnicott, objects from the past are tangible items that accompany the child from a young age and symbolize a mother-figure.
When the child ages, their imaginary friend often emerges in the space between reality and imagination.

As a child, I wished that I could turn my imaginary friend into a real person. One day while working in a kindergarten I met a four-year-old boy by the name of Uri. Uri was a sad boy, often withdrawn and introverted, who rarely spoke. I had a difficult time connecting with him. One day, the other children were lying outside in the grass and I joined them, lying next to Uri and looking up at the clouds. Suddenly Uri burst out laughing and said, “The upside down boy is looking at me!” We continued looking at the clouds, and when it came time to return to classת I turned and waved goodbye at the “upside down boy”. In kindergarten I made sure to save a spot for the boy next to Uri, and at mealtimes I set a place for him next to Uri’s chair. At the end of the day I “placed” Uri’s upside down boy in Uri’s pocket and bid them goodbye. The next day, Uri arrived with his imaginary friend. My communication with Uri circulated around the “upside down boy”. Uri was inseparable from him – he spoke on his behalf, took care of him, and gave him a name. After a few days I brought Uri a glove that I had attached a strip of Velcro to, and let Uri choose from a variety of dolls and stuffed animals I offered to him. He attached the selected doll to the Velcro, sometimes upside down, sometimes right side up.

Uri quickly opened up after that, the dark cloud that had covered his face finally parting. The other children in kindergarten began playing along, making sure that Uri saved a spot for his upside down friend and that he was being taken care of.

Thus a friend was born who was both real and imaginary. A tangible doll who can share the experiences and friendship of a child in their imaginary world. That doll is called Breezy.

The Imaginary Friend

When I was five years old I had an imaginary friend. I do not remember if he had a name, but I do remember that I loved him very much. I would hide him in my pocket so that he could accompany me everywhere – to kindergarten, to the playground, to family visits. I would save a place for him next to me in the car and in bed, and let him eat off my plate at mealtimes. He was with me throughout the most significant moments in my life, like when we moved to a new apartment and when I started First Grade. He was my companion when I was happy or sad, when I laughed or cried. He was my advisor and my mentor. I would tell him stories and ask his advice. I was sorry he was invisible and intangible.

My imaginary friend was my own private secret. I did not want to share him with anyone or tell my family about him. I remember one time when my mother overheard me speaking to him and asked, “Who are you speaking to?” I did not know what to say. If I had told her about my imaginary friend, I am certain she would have said, “There is no such thing”. But for me there was such thing; I really did have a friend who happened to be imaginary. So I remained quiet, and kept my friend a secret.

Research shows that having an imaginary friend is common in a child’s developmental stage, especially with creative children. Statistically, 65% of children experience imaginary friends at one point in their development. Often this experience continues until after the child has begun school.

So who is this imaginary friend? An imaginary friend is a personal companion who belongs only to one child. He is someone with whom the child can share emotions, find consolation, relay messages to and relieve boredom with. He is also someone on whom the child can place blame, for example, “I didn’t take the last piece of cake, my friend did.”

Young children tend to connect to objects from the past. According to psychoanalysis Donald Woods Winnicott, objects from the past are tangible items that accompany the child from a young age and symbolize a mother-figure.
When the child ages, their imaginary friend often emerges in the space between reality and imagination.

As a child, I wished that I could turn my imaginary friend into a real person. One day while working in a kindergarten I met a four-year-old boy by the name of Uri. Uri was a sad boy, often withdrawn and introverted, who rarely spoke. I had a difficult time connecting with him. One day, the other children were lying outside in the grass and I joined them, lying next to Uri and looking up at the clouds. Suddenly Uri burst out laughing and said, “The upside down boy is looking at me!” We continued looking at the clouds, and when it came time to return to classת I turned and waved goodbye at the “upside down boy”. In kindergarten I made sure to save a spot for the boy next to Uri, and at mealtimes I set a place for him next to Uri’s chair. At the end of the day I “placed” Uri’s upside down boy in Uri’s pocket and bid them goodbye. The next day, Uri arrived with his imaginary friend. My communication with Uri circulated around the “upside down boy”. Uri was inseparable from him – he spoke on his behalf, took care of him, and gave him a name. After a few days I brought Uri a glove that I had attached a strip of Velcro to, and let Uri choose from a variety of dolls and stuffed animals I offered to him. He attached the selected doll to the Velcro, sometimes upside down, sometimes right side up.

Uri quickly opened up after that, the dark cloud that had covered his face finally parting. The other children in kindergarten began playing along, making sure that Uri saved a spot for his upside down friend and that he was being taken care of.

Thus a friendship was born who was both real and imaginary. A tangible doll who can share the experiences and friendship of a child in their imaginary world. That doll is called BreezyPals™.

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Never Open the Door to Strangers

Never Open the Door to Strangers

How can we protect our children from dangers without scaring them? How do we teach them to be cautious of strangers without causing them to be distrustful of all other people?

Tuesday was a regular, routine day. It was five o’clock in the afternoon when I picked up my kids from school. When we got home, my children watched a little TV and played together on the rug in the living room. The atmosphere at home was calm and quiet, even magical. I had a headache. I told my children that I was going upstairs to lie down and asked them to keep the noise down. I lie down in bed and immediately fell asleep. When I awoke, I went downstairs to the living room, hugged my children and inquired as to how they had spent their time while I was resting. They told me about a television show they had watched and excitedly showed me a tower made of blocks they had constructed. We all continued on our merry ways – the children with their games and me in the kitchen getting ready for dinner. An hour later, when we were all seated around the dinner table, my six-year-old daughter Gil suddenly said, “Mum, did you know that Grandma and Grandpa came to visit while you slept?”

I stood shocked. How could that be? They live 500 kilometers away from us. There is no way they would have stopped by like that without planning ahead of time.

“Gil”, I said, “Why do you think Grandma and Grandpa were here? And where are they now?” Her younger brother interjected: “They knocked on the door, and when we asked ‘Who is it?’ they answered ‘Grandma and Grandpa’.”

“What?” I asked, flabbergasted.

“Gil wanted to open the door, but I told her that we should wait until you get up, and you would open the door. They are definitely sitting outside in the yard, waiting for you to open the door for them! Do you think they fell asleep?”

I was terrified; horrible thoughts raced through my mind. What would have happened if my children had opened the door? Who were these people claiming to be their grandparents? Would I have lost my children forever? What if….What ifWhat if. The nightmare of every parent.

I turned to my children and said calmly, “You are mature and responsible children, who are both smart and thoughtful. Good for you that you did not open the door without my permission. You acted appropriately. Never open the door to strangers, kids. They may not be who they say they are”.

To illustrate this message to children, watch the following video:

Use BreezyPals’™ way.

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BreezPals™-Clean teeth are healthy teeth

Clean teeth are healthy teeth

How can you turn the points of contention between you and your child into fun, enjoyable activities?

Brushing teeth is extremely important in order to preserve the health and cleanliness of our teeth. Brushing teeth is also an acquired habit, and it is often difficult to induce this habit in children who refuse to brush their teeth.

Five-year-old Dorin said goodbye to her mother and happily entered the kindergarten. Dorin was wearing a pretty floral dress, white boat shoes, and a pink ribbon tied in her hair. Dorin looked so sweet it was if she had just come out of the pages of a children’s fashion magazine.

Every morning, I would greet the children of the kindergarten at the entrance to the class, give each and every one a hug, and wished each and every one a good morning. When Dorin entered the class, she smiled and ran towards me to receive her good morning hug. When I bent down to her to give her a warm embrace I paused for a moment: Dorin had a very unpleasant odor coming from her mouth. I was surprised at my reaction, so I took a deep breath and gave Dorin her morning hug.

Every morning the same ritual took place. Dorin entered the kindergarten looking like a princess yet with a very unpleasant smell from her mouth. And she wasn’t the only one – plenty of my kindergarteners had similarly bad breath.

I didn’t want to offend the children by telling them they had unpleasant odors coming from their mouths, nor did I want the other children to make fun of them.

How can we motivate children to brush their teeth?

I decided that the problem of bad breath needed to be sorted out. I asked the children why they didn’t like brushing their teeth. Their answers varied: “I don’t have time to brush my teeth”, “My brother is always in the bathroom in the morning”, “My teeth hurt when I brush”, “My mum is too busy in the morning to make sure I brush”, “My dog Doogie Boogie doesn’t brush his teeth!”, “I’ve never seen my mum brush her teeth!”, “The toothpaste burns”, and so on and so forth. One answer in particular sparked my attention. When I asked Dorin why she didn’t like to brush her teeth, she answered: “It’s boring to brush my teeth”.

So what can we do?

I told the children stories about the importance of brushing their teeth. I brought different colored toothbrushes to kindergarten so the children could practice. We tasted different flavors of toothpaste to find one that the children liked. We practiced the ritual of teeth brushing. The children happily cooperated and listened to the stories. Yet despite all of my efforts in kindergarten, at home the children still weren’t motivated to brush their teeth, and refused to do so each morning.
I decided to try and tackle the problem with Dorin’s comment in mind: “It’s boring to brush my teeth.” I made up the game, “Faces and Movements.”

I told the children to stand facing the mirror, without mentioning anything connected to brushing their teeth. We played, made faces, sung, and laughed at ourselves in the mirror. The children loved the game. Only later did I finally introduce the toothbrushes.

What happened?

Every morning, as part of the morning activities in kindergarten, we would play the game “Faces and Movements”. Each child received their own personal toothbrush and toothpaste, and with those props would “play” the game.

What was the result?

The children had fun, participated in the permanent ritual of brushing their teeth, and no child was left with an unpleasant odor. As a result, the children taught their parents the game “Faces and Movements”, which became a part of the children’s bedtime and morning routines at home.

To illustrate the process of “Clean Teeth”, watch the following video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=va6eeUkycsI

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This is what BreezyPals™ is all about

It’s hard to think about a parent that has managed to get his kids to love vegetables, let alone eat them!

Tiny Tap is proud to present its first video app - The BreezyPals™ Magical Vegetables!

BreezyPals™ is an educational program that strives to reach children in an original way. Instead of using conventional methods, BreezyPals creates new concepts and imaginary worlds that kids actually want to be a part of - like eating vegetables.

I don’t know about you, but if someone would’ve told me that carrots fly when I was a child, I would’ve eaten them every day!

This is what BreezyPals™ is all about, approaching kids in a new light - talking in their language, instead of forcing them to listen to ours.

How does BreezyPals™ does it? Read below…

BreezyPals™ -How to get your kid to eat vegetables?